The Vietnamese Artisans - Talent Neglected

The Vietnamese Artisans - Talent Neglected

Added over 3 years ago

Guest artile by author, environmental studies student and chef, Fajar Hamid

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The Ethiopian Cross

The Ethiopian Cross

Added over 4 years ago

One of the oldest symbols adopted by the Church, the cross, retains its purest form in Ethiopia, where it can be found in three principal forms: the processional cross, hand cross and the pendant cross...

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Polyandry, or the practice of taking multiple husbands

Polyandry, or the practice of taking multiple husbands

Added over 4 years ago

The custom of taking multiple wives, or polygyny, is well known. The opposite custom, the taking of two or more husbands or polyandry, is rather less well known, and is becoming a very rare practice indeed in the modern world...

Tibetan polyandry. Picture courtesy of the Tibet Travel Centre

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Lawar: a Balinese Delicacy

Lawar: a Balinese Delicacy

Added over 5 years ago

If you’ve ever been to Bali, you’ve probably sampled a version of the local savory delicacy called lawar. One of the island’s most iconic dishes, lawar literally means “thinly sliced” or “finely chopped”, and consists of chopped meat and vegetables mixed together with fragrant spices and herbs. It is typically served at important Balinese events and ceremonies. However, visitors to Bali can easily find different versions of lawar in most restaurants and warungs...

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Balinese House Compounds: a Microcosom of the Universe

Balinese House Compounds: a Microcosom of the Universe

Added over 5 years ago

A visitor to the smaller towns and villages of Bali would be forgiven for thinking that temples adorn every street corner and all of the spaces in between. High walls with the smallest of doorways allow only the briefest of views by passers-by, while above the walls there are tantalizing glimpses of exquisitely carved shrines, some no larger than birdcages. However, these are all in fact private residences, more properly called compounds or karangs, which may house several generations of Balinese families at one time.

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Remembering Bamiyan

Remembering Bamiyan

Added over 6 years ago

Early in 2001 Mullah Muhammad Omar, the leader of Afghanistan's Taliban movement, ordered the destruction of all non-Islamic shrines and statues in the shattered land over which he presided.  And so the wanton destruction of the two standing Buddhas of Bamiyan was brought about, amongst the oldest and greatest relics of Buddhist antiquity.  Article by Dr. Andrew Forbes.  

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A Uyghur Fairy Tale: the Clever Young Man

A Uyghur Fairy Tale: the Clever Young Man

Added over 6 years ago

The Uyghur people originated in Mongolia, and over the ages moved slowly westwards until they settled in the Taklamakan Desert region of China's far north west.  Centred in and around the city of Kashgar, smaller communities can also be found today in Turkmanestan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Russia.  Today most Uyghurs are Muslims and practice Sufism.  They have developed a strong tradition of story telling, and their fables reflect their rich and varied cultural history.  Here we present a Uyghur folktale, called The Clever Young Man, which is brimming with heroes, evil villains, ogres and princesses, for your reading pleasure. Our thanks to Alip of the Kashgar Caravan Travel Agency for this translation.

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The Practice of Headhunting

The Practice of Headhunting

Added over 6 years ago

Head hunting has been practiced by numerous people throughout the world from ancient times all the way into the 21th century. The term describes the practice of cutting off and preserving the head or skull of a fallen enemy. But why do people take heads?

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Yao Heavens

Yao Heavens

Added over 6 years ago

The Yao are a Hill Tribe success story. More affluent and outgoing than any of the other upland peoples, the roots of their cultural confidence and commercial ability are founded in a long tradition of literacy and close association with things Chinese. The Yao have a very clear idea of who and what they are - aristocratic nomads of the hills, subject to none, but deeply committed to the traditional Sinitic world-view of which they form part...

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Tribal People of the World: The Rabari People of Northwest India

Tribal People of the World: The Rabari People of Northwest India

Added over 8 years ago

Who are the Rabari and what makes them different to the other peoples of India?

Picture shows an group of Rabari nomads camped on the grounds of the famous Umaid Bhagwan Palace, home of Jaipur's current Maharaja and his family and now one of Jaipur's leading hotels.  The Rabaris camp on the grounds with the permission of the Maharaja, and survive not only by pasturing their meagre heards of cattle and goats, but also by selling old handicrafts and artifacts to the local traders, who in turn sell to buyers such as myself.

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